AWARE SYSTEMS
TIFF and LibTiff Mail List Archive

Thread

2004.09.10 21:01 "[Tiff] Segmentation fault with tifflook", by Matthew R. Kivela
2004.09.13 15:03 "Re: [Tiff] Segmentation fault with tifflook", by Frank Warmerdam
2004.09.13 15:19 "Re: [Tiff] Segmentation fault with tifflook", by Andy Cave

2004.09.13 15:03 "Re: [Tiff] Segmentation fault with tifflook", by Frank Warmerdam

Hi Guys:

We're setting up a new RIP system, and the vendor sent us tifflook and a script to use it to remove "blank" tiffs before they're sent to our printing plant (i.e. we rip a B&W page, we still get blank TIFFs generated for Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow). Tried using, got core dump messages (can't remember specific text).

I believe we're their first Solaris 9 site, so I said I bet it's not compiled for that!

Downloaded LibTIFF v3.6.1, and got gcc 3.4.1 and the current libiconv packages. Installed the packages, then made LibTIFF.

Darn it...still get (even using sample tiffs so it's not our files doing it!):

#/usr/local/bin/tifflook -t635 -b635 -l635 -r635 ./pics-3.6.1/text.tif Segmentation Fault (core dumped)

Same error w/o the t/b/l/r switches, too.

Any ideas where I should go with this? I'll be working with the vendor, too but I'm not sure this is exactly their cup of tea either.

Matt,

Tifflook is not a libtiff utility as far as I know. I presume it was written by your vendor? Did you recompile it for use with libtiff 3.6.1? Depending on how the libtiff API is used by the application, it may be required.

Assuming you have done that, you will likely need to get a traceback. You should also try with some other files... hopefully some "simple" files, to see if the problem is universal. There were also some issues with some fax compressed images in at least one of the 3.6.x releases so it is possible you are running into that - which is one of the reasons I sugest trying some other simple images.

Absent a fix for this, any other ideas of how to identify TIFFs that are essentially just white space from a Shell script so they can go to the happy hunting grounds of /dev/null?

I can't think of anything non-obvious. The obvious is to convert them RGBA and check that all pixels are near-white.

Best regards,

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